Science Photos

Not VanGogh, Just a Satellite Weather Map of Antarctica and its balmy -50.4 ºC springtime temperatures.Antarctica_LooksLike StarryNight

Total lunar eclipse of September 28, 2015  There was actually more red seen in pictures (for example in the collage of my photographs with less than optimal zoom) than by the naked eye. This time around the amount of dust in the atmosphere combined with refraction by the earth’s atmosphere made it look brown rather than red. See Earth and Sky explanation.

Total lunar eclipse of September 28, 2015  
Total lunar eclipse of September 28, 2015
103_9334
A mystery molecule

From Fun With a Failing Memory

Birdsfoot trefoil, vetch & red clover abound near St.Laurent's duBoisé library, one designed with ecology in mind.
Birdsfoot trefoil, vetch & red clover abound near St.Laurent’s duBoisé library, one designed with ecology in mind.

from Why Lawn Grass Isn’t Green

Forest in Parc Nationale d'Oka, in Quebec, near Montreal. --photograph by the author
Forest in Parc Nationale d’Oka, in Quebec, near Montreal. –photograph by the author

From Canadians, Not Exactly Stewards of the Earth

Photo: Science In the Kitchen---Notice that the egg on top of the picture has an off-centered yolk. The bottom one does not. I partially followed molecular gastronomist Herve This' advice, While it was cooking, I rotated one of the eggs to prevent the less-dense yolk from rising, but he recommended rotation for 10 minutes. Instead I hypothesized that there is enough coagulation of proteins after 5 minutes to prevent the yolk from rising. So I only rotated one egg, once a minute for 5 minutes, turned off the heat, and left the eggs in the pot with the lid on for 5 more minutes. When I took them out, the water was still at 90 oC, still hot enough to create hard boiled eggs. (Only 68 oC is sufficient to coagulate all proteins in the egg.)
Perfectly centered yolks

From Science in the Kitchen

The sand pine (Pinus Clausa) , endemic to Florida and southern states, is mostly confined to sandy , infertile soils. But it's the dominant tree in sand scrub ecosystems that harbor threatened species.
The sand pine (Pinus Clausa) , endemic to Florida and southern states, is mostly confined to sandy , infertile soils. But it’s the dominant tree in sand scrub ecosystems that harbor threatened species.

From Protected Zones in Florida 

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